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Discussion SSD Life Expectancy

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Habofro

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Today, almost all SSds store data in NAND flash memory cells.
A big limitation of flash memory is the number of program/erase (P/E) cycles it can go through before the cell fails.

Nowadays, SSDs P/E cycles vary from 500 to 100 000 P/E cycles.

There are many different types of NAND flash:

The first one to have been invented was SLC (Single level cell). These types of NAND flash typically have a P/E rating of 50 000 to 100 000 cycles. However, SLC is very expensive to manufacture. SLC is mostly used in server application.

There's also MLC and eMLC (Multi level cell and Enterprise Multi level cell). MLC stores 2 bits of data per cell, thus lowering the cost of the SSD but also decreases it's P/E rating since the cell is used twice as often. eMLC cells are not that different from MLC. They typically have lower write speed, thus improving their P/E rating. An eMLC drive should be rated at 10 000 to 30 000 P/E and an MLC drive at 3 000 to 10 000 P/E.

Finally, there is TLC (Triple level cell), which stores three bit of data per cell, thus lowering the cost even more. At the cost of it's P/E rating. Typically, a TLC drive will have a P/E rating of 500 to 2 000.

In recent years, new NAND technology has been invented: 3D NAND, which was developped by Intel and Micron, and stacks cells in 32 layers and there's V-NAND, which was developed by Samsung and stacks cells in 48 layers.

These technologies aim to improve capacity and in the process, improve P/E ratings.

SSDs nowadays use a system called Wear leveling, which aims to level the wear of each cells, thus improving it's life expectancy. This is particularly important for SSDs since data has to be erased in blocks.

A good way to improve the life of your SSD is to keep at least 10% of the space on your SSD free. Some manufacturer even leave 10% of the drive unformated to help with the life expectancy of their drives. Leaving free spaces helps the SSD evens out its wear level. This is why getting a bigger capacity SSD will improve its life expectancy.

Manufacturers usually rate their drives in PBW, short for Petabytes written. The bigger the number, the longer the drive should last before it fails.

SSDs should normally last for the whole life of your PC. As long as you don't torture it. I would have no problem in leaving my data on SSDs. Just take care of your SSDs and you should not have any issues with them!

C Cakes Proposed that I give some stats for the most popular SSDs. Here's a few popular SSDs and their P/E and expected lifespan
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If you want me to make data sheet for any other SSD, let me know!
If you want to make your own, here's the PSD
 
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Cakes

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Today, almost all SSds store data in NAND flash memory cells.
A big limitation of flash memory is the number of program/erase (P/E) cycles it can go through before the cell fails.

Nowadays, SSDs P/E cycles vary from 500 to 100 000 P/E cycles.

There are many different types of NAND flash:

The first one to have been invented was SLC (Single level cell). These types of NAND flash typically have a P/E rating of 50 000 to 100 000 cycles. However, SLC is very expensive to manufacture. SLC is mostly used in server application.

There's also MLC and eMLC (Multi level cell and Enterprise Multi level cell). MLC stores 2 bits of data per cell, thus lowering the cost of the SSD but also decreases it's P/E rating since the cell is used twice as often. eMLC cells are not that different from MLC. They typically have lower write speed, thus improving their P/E rating. An eMLC drive should be rated at 10 000 to 30 000 P/E and an MLC drive at 3 000 to 10 000 P/E.

Finally, there is TLC (Triple level cell), which stores three bit of data per cell, thus lowering the cost even more. At the cost of it's P/E rating. Typically, a TLC drive will have a P/E rating of 500 to 2 000.

In recent years, new NAND technology has been invented: 3D NAND, which was developped by Intel and Micron, and stacks cells in 32 layers and there's V-NAND, which was developed by Samsung and stacks cells in 48 layers.

These technologies aim to improve capacity and in the process, improve P/E ratings.

SSDs nowadays use a system called Wear leveling, which aims to level the wear of each cells, thus improving it's life expectancy. This is particularly important for SSDs since data has to be erased in blocks.

A good way to improve the life of your SSD is to keep at least 10% of the space on your SSD free. Some manufacturer even leave 10% of the drive unformated to help with the life expectancy of their drives. Leaving free spaces helps the SSD evens out its wear level. This is why getting a bigger capacity SSD will improve its life expectancy.

Manufacturers usually rate their drives in PBW, short for Petabytes written. The bigger the number, the longer the drive should last before it fails.

SSDs should normally last for the whole life of your PC. As long as you don't torture it. I would have no problem in leaving my data on SSDs. Just take care of your SSDs and you should not have any issues with them!
You should include some stats for commonly used SSDs, like the 850 EVO 250G :whistle:. Interesting stuff, though.
 
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Habofro

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You should include some stats for commonly used SSDs, like the 850 EVO 250G :whistle:. Interesting stuff, though.
Yeah I thought of that but, the issue is that the PBW varies depending on the size of the SSD. I might do it with the most popular SSDs. Thanks for the idea!

You should include some stats for commonly used SSDs, like the 850 EVO 250G :whistle:. Interesting stuff, though.
Now I've made a few data sheet. Gotta wait for 7s to fix the PNG bug tho lmao
 
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