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Tutorial RGH 1.2 Start to finish tutorial + how to get a CR4 like experience (Phats only)

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JoinTheResistance

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In this tutorial I am going to show you how to do a rgh1.2 install on phat console using a matrix glitcher, x360 ace, TX coolrunner, cr3 lite and a squirt chip. First of all let's start with what rgh1.2 is and what you will be needing.
RGH1.2 is a new hack that was developed by a Russian programmer going by the nickname 15432. RGH1.2 offers RGH1 like boot times, but unlike RGH1 it can be done on consoles updated past the 14699 dashboard. Sometimes it might not get you as good boot times as RGH1, but it's a lot better than RGH2, which is what updated consoles were stuck with (a part from the overpriced cr4), before rgh1.2 came out. In conclusion, if you have a phat console on the latest dashboard, rgh1.2 is the way to go.

Here is a full list of supported consoles.
Xenon - Not very reliable, refer to this
Zephyr - Supported
Falcon - Supported
Jasper - Supported
All slims - Not supported

Now onto the other hardware that you will need.

Mandatory hardware

Soldering iron
Soldering supplies (flux and solder)
Depending on what glitch board you get you might also need some wires and a 22K resistor.

The next thing that you will need is a glitch board, sometimes also called glitch chip or RGH chip.
There are many glitch chips out there and they all work. Since the RGH (reset glitch hack) uses a glitch in the xbox 360 CPU and every console is different and there is really no way to know what chip is going to be the best for your console. Here are the most popular glitch chips and their pros and cons.

Matrix glitcher


Pros
Cheap
Can be programmed with an LPT cable, modified matrix nand flasher, nand-x or a JR programmer.
Works on a xenon

Cons
Doesn't have programming headers (more on that later)
Doesn't support the dynamic file (more on that later)

TX Coolrunner rev C/D

Pros
Cheap
Can be programmed with an LPT cable, modified matrix nand flasher, nand-x or a JR programmer.

Cons
Doesn't support the dynamic file (more on that later)

CR3 Lite


Pros
Can be programmed with an LPT cable, modified matrix nand flasher, nand-x or a JR programmer.
Has built in dip switches for fine tuning.

Cons
Doesn't support the dynamic file (more on that later)
Hard to find and a bit more expensive than the matrix glitcher and coolrunner rev C/D

360 Squirt

Pretty much the same pros and cons as the matrix glitcher, only a bit more expensive.

X360 ACE

Pros
Cheap
Supports the dynamic file (more on that later)
Can also be used in a slim console (not covered in this tutorial)

Cons
A JR programmer or a nand-x is needed to program it.
Doesn't have programming headers (more on that later)

The next thing that you will need is a device to read and write to the nand (the chip were the xbox 360 software is stored on).

SPI LPT cable

The cheapest thing to use is an SPI LPT cable. This method however, is very unreliable, slow and generally bad so I won't be going into detail about it.


USB SPI flashers (matrix nand flasher)

This method is more reliable, faster and a much easier to use, than the LPT cable. The most popular and easiest to find is the matrix spi nand flasher. Its price varies between 3$ and 5$.
It has some downsides, though. The matrix nand flasher can't be used to program the glitch chip, without modifying it first. More on how to modify the matrix nand flasher here. Another downside is that even after the modification it still can't be used to program the x360 ace chips, so if you are going to use an ace chip, you will need a JR programmer or nand-x.


JR programmer/Nand-X

Before I go in detail about these programmers I'd like to say that the nand-x isn't being produced anymore, is hard to find, and very expensive. The JR programmer is the nand-x successor and its only downside is that it is a bit slower, however the speed difference is small and neglectable.
The JR programmer is faster than the matrix spi nand flasher, it can program all of the glitch boards mentioned above, without any modifications. Its only downside is that it costs more, 15-25$*. I think that the extra price you pay is worth it and I personally recommend that you get the JR programmer instead of the matrix nand flasher, especially if this is going to be your first time attempting to RGH a console.
*There are clones on sites like aliexpress that cost less.


Optional things that you might need

Pin headers if you are using a matrix glitcher, x360 ace or squirt.
Solder pump useful for removing shorts
Multimeter (DMM) useful for troubleshooting


Software needed

[Click here to view this link]
[Click here to view this link]
Falcon and Jasper [Click here to view this link] (x360 ace ONLY!)
Xenon [Click here to view this link] (x360 ace ONLY!)
Xenon [Click here to view this link]
Additional [Click here to view this link] (x360 ace ONLY!)

Extra stuff:
Original source of the files
RGH1.2 release thread
And in case you need it, the source code: [Click here to view this link]

Let's start!

Step one - Getting matching nand dumps
The first thing to do is install the JR-programmer/matrix nand flasher drivers.
First connect the device to your computer and wait until windows tells you that it can't find the drivers. After that go into device manager and locate the JR programmer/matrix nand flasher, it should show up as unknown device or memory access. Next right click on it, "Update Driver software", "Browse my computer for driver software" and point it to the jrunner folder. After you have the drivers installed it's time to connect the JRP/MTX flasher to the xbox.
Here are the install diagrams for the JR programmer and the matrix nand flasher.
Matrix



JRP/Nand-X
Note: The JR programmer (JRP) and nand-x come with plugs on the end of the cables, which you will need to cut off (unless you're using QSBs)


After you have the cables soldered to the motherboard, plug the power cable in the xbox, but do NOT power it on! Connect the usb cable to your programmer and your PC and launch jrunner.
You should see either the nand-x or JR programmer logo next to the "CPU key database" button, if it's not there your drivers probably aren't installed properly. If you see the logo you should be able to proceed. Note: the matrix nand flasher shows up as a Nand-X in jrunner.

You need to get two matching nand dumps so make sure that under reads you have at least 2. To begin reading the nand click on "Read Nand". After it's done doing all of the nand reads jrunner is going to compare them and tell you if they are the same. If you get "Nands are the same" then you are ready to continue. If you get any bad blocks, don't worry about them, jrunner will remap them automatically, just make sure that the nand dumps match. If your nand dumps don't match or you get a "Wrong version 0x0000000" error, then check your soldering and try again. Do NOT continue until you have at least 2 matching nand dumps.

Step 2 - Creating and flashing the ECC
After getting the matching nand dumps, select "glitch2" on the right hand side of jrunner and click on "create ECC". Once it says "ECC created", click on "Write ECC" and wait until jrunner writes the ECC back to your console.

NOTE: If you are using a matrix nand flasher you will get "Failed to write block XXX" on every block while you are writing to the nand. Don't worry these errors are fake, as long as you don't get any errors while reading the nand you should be fine.


Step 3 - Programming the glitch chip

If you are using a JR programmer

First unplug the nand read/write cable from your JR programmer and connect the xsvf programming cable in the top plug. If you're using a matrix glitcher, ace or squirt board, you have probably seen that there is nowhere to plug the other end of the cable in, well this is where those headers from before come in. Here is what your chip will look like after soldering the headers.



Note: The extra LED is not needed for RGH1.2
Note 2: You can actually push the headers trough the holes like on the ace board, not exactly sure why I didn't do it on this photo :tongue:
On the JRP cable you will have a few labels, when you are plugging the cable in the glitch board make sure that you match them with the labels on the board that you are using. The ace chip doesn't have labels so use this picture instead.

After you have the headers soldered and all of the cables plugged in, switch the switch near the xsvf port on the JRP to the side closer to the port itself.


To flash the timing file, open jrunner and go to advanced, then custom nand/cr functions, select Xsvf and click the "..." on the right. Next, use the the window that just popped up to navigate to where you have the RGH1.2 files extracted, go in the "try_these_first" folder then into the folder with the name of the chip that you are using (if you have a TX coolrunner or a CR3 lite, use the matrix folder). You will see 3 sub folders in there, ignore the "jed" and "svf" folder, the files we need are in the Xsvf folder. After you open the Xsvf folder, you will see the RGH1.2 timing files. Every console is different so you will need to keep trying different files until you find a file that gives you the boot times you desire. Anyway, select the first file, click open and then "RUN". Wait until jrunner flashes the file onto the chip, after it's done disconnect the chip and proceed to the next step.

If you are using a modified matrix SPI nand flasher
Use the instructions from my thread on how to modify the nand flasher to flash the files onto the chip. Warning: You won't be able to program an x360 ace chip with the matrix nand flasher and you will need a JR programmer/Nand-X if you're using that chip.

Step 4 - Installing the chip in the console

Follow the diagrams from bellow to solder the wires from the chips to the motherboard.
Try to keep the wires short and away from coils. Also try to not have any wires touching each other, since that causes interference between the wires and sometimes slower boots.

TX Coolrunner


CR3 Lite


Matrix Glitcher


Squirt


X360 ACE
The ace chips are a bit more complicated than the other ones. For them you will need a 22K resistor and depending on what version ace you have you will either have to remove a resistor or a diode. See the pictures below.

Install diagram
*For the install diagram below I have used an X360 ace V3 rev 2 board. If you have a different board, use this picture to solder the 1.8V point, the rest of the points D, F, C, 5V and GND are the same on all versions of the ace.



Alternative points
CPU_RST



CLK



*I recommend that you use one of the alternative CLK points since they are a lot easier to solder to.

In the spoilers below you'll find 15432's examples of good wiring.


And a few personal photos





Step 5 - Getting the CPU key

After you have soldered the chip onto the board it's time to get the cpu key. First you need to disconnect the JR programmer/Matrix nand flasher from the motherboard. If you are using the JR programmer you can simply unplug the cable from the JRP itself. If you are using a matrix nand flasher however, you will need to desolder the cables. *You can also solder headers on the MTX nand flasher and a plug to your cable if you don't want to desolder the cables every time you want to turn the console on.

Once you have your nand reader disconnected from the motherboard, plug the power and HDMI/AV cables in and turn your console on. Now the glitch chip will attempt to glitch your console. If your console doesn't boot within a minute, program the chip with a different timing file. Note: if you are using an x360 ace chip you will need to have the xbox 360 cable plugged into the console (the console MUST be off) after you have removed the resistor/diode from it, in order to program it. If you aren't using an x360 ace make sure that the power cable is unplugged while you are programming the chip.

If you can't find a file that works for you in the try_these_first folder, try the files in the if_you_mad folder. Still can't get your console to boot? Check the getting a cr4 like experience section of this thread.

Once your console boots you will see the Xell Reloaded screen.


Wait a bit and it will scroll down to your CPU and DVD key. The one we need now is the CPU key, so take a picture if it or write it down.


Once you have your cpu key turn your console off and continue to the final step.

Final step - Generating a Xebuild image and flashing it onto the console.
First you will need to add the dashboard files. To do this in jrunner open the drop down menu under Dash version, click on add dash, check the box next to the dashboard version you wish to create, select the latest one if unsure, which is 17349 at the time of writing this tutorial, and click on Add dashes

So, since jrunner no longer updates, you will either need to use 17511 for the initial XeBuild (even if your console was on a higher dash prior to RGHing it), or update it yourself like this.
Don't worry about that now, you can later update to the latest dashboard.
Make sure that you have 17511 selected under dash version.



Load one of your nand dumps into "source" in jrunner and enter your CPU key in the CPU key box.
Don't worry about mistyping your cpu key, jrunner will tell you "CPU key is correct" if you have entered it correctly.
Once you have entered your CPU key correctly and downloaded the latest dashboard, select "glitch2" from the right and click on "Create Xebuild image". Note: If you aren't getting instant boot times you can check the "CR4" box next to glitch2 to reduce the time between glitch attempts.
Once it's done creating your image connect your JR programmer/matrix nand flasher to your console and PC, then plug the xbox 360 power cable in the console, but do NOT turn the console on! Next click on "Write Nand" and wait for it to write the image onto the console.

After it's done writing the image unplug everything and wait 30s, after that plug the xbox 360 power and HDMI/AV cables in (make sure that your nand programmer is NOT connected to the console) and turn your xbox on. Your console should now boot into the default dashboard. And that's pretty much it, now all you have to do is desolder the nand cables and put your console back together.


If you can't get your console to glitch there are many things to try, too many for me to mention them all in this thread. I suggest that you head over to teamx360.co.uk and doing some reading in the RGH1.2 section. If you can't find a solution there, then open a thread in the "Xbox 360 support" section here on se7ensins or over at teamx360.co.uk and we'll try to help you as best as we can.

A few pics of the x360 ace installed into two of the consoles I've done.





Getting a CR4 like experience/Glitching stubborn consoles

So, maybe you don't want to try so many different timing files, or maybe none of them give you reliable boot times, well there is an alternative!

What you will need:
The software from above, a JR programmer/Nand-X and an X360 ace.


How to do it:

Follow the same procedure as before, only this time instead of flashing the regular timing files, you have to flash the dynamic/auto-tuning file onto the X360 ace. Also make sure that you have the CR4 box checked in j-runner before creating the Xebuild image.

The dynamic file changes its settings if the console is unable to boot, so the first time it will take a few glitch attempts for it to boot (usually 2-4), after that you should be getting 1-2 glitch boots. Keep in mind that every time you unplug your console's power cable the timing file will reset itself and it will take it a few extra glitches to get your console to boot. 4 glitch attempts with the CR4 SMC (if you checked the CR4 box in jrunner) is around 30 seconds, which is pretty good for a non JTAG or RGH1 console. If you just power off your console without unplugging the power cable you should be seeing boot times of 8-15 seconds.
Keep in mind that every console is different and you might not be getting the results from above, if that is the case you can play around with the wires and try the static timing files, or live with the slower boot times.

Thanks, for reading! I hope this tutorial helped you in some way. This is probably the longest tutorial I have ever written so please let me know what you think about it, and if you think that I have missed something or that something needs more clarification.
If you need help getting your console RGHed open a thread in the "Xbox 360 Support" section and me and/or the other members will try to assist as best as we can! If you have any questions, please post them below instead of PMing me so that others who have the same question as you, may find the answer quicker.

EDIT: We are now on page 16 of "help, I can't boot Xell" and I would like to remind you that this is NOT a support thread! Please, if you need general help with the RGH install open a new thread in the xbox 360 support section. If you want an answer directly from me either tag me by typing "@" + JoinTheResistance or PM me the link to your thread.
I still urge you to post here with specific questions, like "Can I do this instead of that", "Can I use this chip", "Is it going to work if I do this and that", "Do you recommend that I...".
"Help my console won't boot!" is NOT a specific question, but a support request, and as such belongs in the support section!
Thank you, for understanding! :smile:
 
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ProJimmyRustler

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Dude. Thank you so much for this!

I will be using this tut soon. I wasn't able to find a decent one that was in English!
 
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JoinTheResistance

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Dude. Thank you so much for this!

I will be using this tut soon. I wasn't able to find a decent one that was in English!
I'm glad you like it, let me know how the install goes and if you need any help.
 
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Hypotoad

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Great tutorial, I used the Matrix V3 on a Jasper 16mb and it worked first time using file 12_21.xsvf and checking the CR4 box, RGH1.2 is fantastic.

The only thing you might like to add is the other alternate Clk point FT2R2 on the underside.
 
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Noobert

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Right on dude!!

I was wondering when someone was gonna make this tutorial. I thought I was gonna have to :tongue:.

Very nice!
 
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JoinTheResistance

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Great tutorial, I used the Matrix V3 on a Jasper 16mb and it worked first time using file 12_21.xsvf and checking the CR4 box, RGH1.2 is fantastic.

The only thing you might like to add is the other alternate Clk point FT2R2 on the underside.
Done! Thanks!
Right on dude!!

I was wondering when someone was gonna make this tutorial. I thought I was gonna have to :tongue:.

Very nice!
Thank you for the input, I appreciate it. If you have any suggestions, don't hesitate to let me know.
 
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28belinea31

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do the dynamic timing file always work, without have to tune the cables? if yes, which ace you would prefer, or works the best?
 
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JoinTheResistance

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do the dynamic timing file always work, without have to tune the cables? if yes, which ace you would prefer, or works the best?
As long as your wires aren't routed too bad, it should work.
About the best chip, the ace v2 works better sometimes, but it's possible that v3 is better on some other consoles, but they both work. Just get what you can find and don't stress about it too much.
 
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Yelawolf

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For the TX Coolrunner RGH 1.2 is there an alternative POST location?
 
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Yelawolf

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The opposite side of the POST? underneath the heatsink?
 
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Them freaking clamps piss me off and pliers scrap the board and yea..
Put a T8 screw driver in the gap that's between the x-clamp and the screw hole, then push the screw driver towards the middle of the x-clamp, if the first corner doesn't pop off, try the other ones until two of them come off, then all you have to do is wiggle the x-clamp until it comes off.
 
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Yelawolf

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Put a T8 screw driver in the gap that's between the x-clamp and the screw hole, then push the screw driver towards the middle of the x-clamp, if the first corner doesn't pop off, try the other ones until two of them come off, then all you have to do is wiggle the x-clamp until it comes off.
OMG I got it.. :biggrin: now.. whats the point? lmao
 
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JoinTheResistance

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OMG I got it.. :biggrin: now.. whats the point? lmao
Sorry, I was talking about some guy about RGH2 and I misled you a bit. The trace for RGH1.2 is actually on the bottom side of the motherboard. I've marked it in red here:
 
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Yelawolf

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/.\ Yes that what i need an alternate of. The story why is the board was on my stand and my cat knocked it off and it fell ripping the wire off, So i cannot solder it back on to that point.
 
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