Web Nameservers & DNS

Discussion in 'Support and Debugging' started by lowpro, Feb 16, 2017 with 6 replies and 236 views.

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  1. lowpro

    lowpro Professional Abecedarian

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    So I'm kind of confused about what nameservers do:

    I have a website,
    Code:
    test.com
    , that has the following records:
    Code:
    @ (A RECORD) PARK
    www (CNAME) test.com
    And the nameservers point at 000webhost:
    Code:
    ns01.000webhost.com
    ns02.000webhost.com
    What are the nameservers doing? If I move my site to a VPS using apache, do the nameservers point at my IP? I know for Let's Encrypt my A RECORD should point at the IP, I'm not sure what the nameservers are actually doing, and what I would do with only 1 IP address.
    Any help in understanding is greatly appreciated.
     
  2. NukeZilla

    NukeZilla Premium Premium

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    I think you are actually asking two questions here:
    1. What is DNS
    2. How does SSL work
    DNS stands for Domain Name System. It allows you to route to a server/servers without knowing the IP. Where as encryption encrypts the data flow to and from the server to the user.

    In short if the I changes then you will need to update your DNS systems. I can go into more about DNS but it's a complex system and different records means different things. but feel free to ask anything more pacific.

    Kind regards,
    Jordan
     
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  3. Cakes

    Cakes Administrator Administrator

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    The nameservers are part of how DNS as a whole works. When you type in test.com in your browser, a DNS lookup is started. That DNS lookup will get the Nameservers that are attached to the domain that you just entered. The Nameservers attached to that domain has that domains Records; such as A, CNAME, MX, etc. The Nameserver will say: Hey, the IP that test.com points to is 66.67.55.142! So then your browser knows to send your connection request to that IP address. When your request hits the server at 66.67.55.142 (just an example IP), the server itself will need to be configured to handle that request. For example, if you send a HTTP (:80) request to a server that is only listening for HTTPS (:443) connections, you won't be able to connect.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017
  4. OP
    lowpro

    lowpro Professional Abecedarian

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    Ah thanks! I didn't realize DNS and nameservers as referenced on hosting sites were the same thing. I thought when you made a DNS request (like to 8.8.8.8) that was a global DNS system, didn't know it went to other DNS servers to find specific websites. So if I wanted to self-host, I shouldn't have to host a DNS server correct? I'm using easydns.com for the domain name, but I should just be able to point one of the records at the IP of my server (not sure which one)?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 16, 2017
  5. Cakes

    Cakes Administrator Administrator

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    The DNS server that your connection is using is where the DNS lookup will start from. So if you've set your PC's IPv4 DNS server to Google's Public DNS, any DNS requests made from your machine will be processed by their server. Your request is sent to their DNS server, which does the lookup, then handles the data as I mentioned above.

    I'm not sure about self hosting, but as long as you're going to be entering in a domain name, you'll need a DNS server of to resolve it into an IP address (to perform the lookup).

    So basically: Your browser -> [Google DNS/Other DNS server] -> Lookup to get the IP -> sends request to server -> server responds.
     
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  6. OP
    lowpro

    lowpro Professional Abecedarian

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    Cool so I figured out what do, posting for others, thanks Cakes NukeZilla

    Nameservers and DNS servers are the same thing, so when you buy a domain (for example from easydns.com), you have DNS settings and nameserver settings. The DNS settings only work if the nameservers point to the company, in this case easydns. Since I had them pointed at 000webhost, no DNS changes I made in easydns mattered. Once I pointed the NS records to easydns, I could add an A record to my server IP address which made it work, it just took a few hours to propagate.
     
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  7. Cakes

    Cakes Administrator Administrator

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    Yep, that sounds about right.
     
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