What's new

Tutorial How to make a homemade Xbox 360 controller wireless receiver for PC!

  • Thread starter halopro77
  • Start date
  • Views 360,576
C

Chefren

Newbie
Messages
8
Reaction score
1
I would like to know if i can plug it back on my xbox 360 after the modifications and use it normally. Through the normal connection or through the USB (I don't think via USB).
It would be awesome to have a receiver that works both for PC and xbox 360

Yes you can plug it back to x360, but only if you unplug it from PC. Do not plug it to PC & X360 on the same time, one device at the time. Don't plug USB cable you added to X360.
 
Yousef9910

Yousef9910

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hello,I'm really grateful for this tutorial but I would like some help about an Issue I had encountered that is too simple.
My xbox 360 RF Module belongs to a slim one,my problem is THAT I cant figure out which parts to solder because my Rf module is different than what it shown in the your image (as you can see below)
19KaWjz.jpg

t9YrZ97.jpg
 
Decy

Decy

Getting There
Messages
1,341
Reaction score
514
This is to much work for me.. lol nice tut tho
 
Space

Space

PlayStation 4 ✔
Messages
2,785
Reaction score
1,697
Thanks Bro you helped my dad out cheers
 
TechModZ

TechModZ

☆☆ Xbox Hoster ☆☆
Messages
1,173
Reaction score
421
ima just buy one thats coned for 5$
 
SE7EN BAGZ

SE7EN BAGZ

Newbie
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Can you make this without the diode?
 
Zachtie

Zachtie

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Can you make this without the diode?
On some models the diode is recommended however not needed. This is not true for every model. It is safe to use a diode on every model (and again, recommended). If you do not have a diode, use a Standard LED (light emitting Diode). It will work just as a regular diode and it will light up to tell you the card is receiving power. This it true of you are using the simple USB modification, however if you are going added syncing functionality to the chip from a PC. You will need to go further, READ THE WHOLE THREAD (it has all the info you will need on the subject)
 
2Quick4U

2Quick4U

Getting There
Services Seasoned Veteran Grizzled Veteran
Messages
1,139
Reaction score
465
slimrolusbpc_zps34894e7d.jpg
Hello,I'm really grateful for this tutorial but I would like some help about an Issue I had encountered that is too simple.
My xbox 360 RF Module belongs to a slim one,my problem is THAT I cant figure out which parts to solder because my Rf module is different than what it shown in the your image (as you can see below)
19KaWjz.jpg

t9YrZ97.jpg
you don't need a diod the only reason they are using it is they are trying to drop 5 v to 3.3 v
Here is a quick mock up of doing it the correct way using a 5v to 3.3 v converter regulator.
powerdiagram_zps38e25e88.png

2015-02-2022-50-34100_zpsc987d996.jpg

PS you can get the regulator from a old fat motherboard
STP67402_zps3980e2b9.jpg
 
Last edited:
L

llRookll

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
do you need the Arduino for the RF REv H MOdule to communicate with the Computer?
 
C

Crystian182

Newbie
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
Hi guys,
i'm from Italy so sorry for my bad english.
I see there are very interesting arguments here.
I am trying to do this job with my Xbox 360 Wireless module REV F MODEL RF01.
The solder job was ok! There aren't contacts between 4 usb cables.
But when I connect the module to the pc, it recognizes it but the led on the module doesn't turn on..it is turned off.
I installed drivers, indeed, in the list of the connected devices, there is the "xbox 360 wireless controller".
I used 2 diodes 1N4007 DC on the red cable and they are ok because i check the voltage between red and black cables and there are 3.53V.
What can i do? I don't think the module is dead because it worked on my old xbox 360 with red lights of death. I tried to remake the solder job in a better way but it is the same.
Thank you
 
robot9706

robot9706

Enthusiast
Messages
365
Reaction score
111
Hi guys,
i'm from Italy so sorry for my bad english.
I see there are very interesting arguments here.
I am trying to do this job with my Xbox 360 Wireless module REV F MODEL RF01.
The solder job was ok! There aren't contacts between 4 usb cables.
But when I connect the module to the pc, it recognizes it but the led on the module doesn't turn on..it is turned off.
I installed drivers, indeed, in the list of the connected devices, there is the "xbox 360 wireless controller".
I used 2 diodes 1N4007 DC on the red cable and they are ok because i check the voltage between red and black cables and there are 3.53V.
What can i do? I don't think the module is dead because it worked on my old xbox 360 with red lights of death. I tried to remake the solder job in a better way but it is the same.
Thank you
If your computer recognises the module, then is's working fine. Controlling the module is an other story. There are 2 more pins on the "wider" line (5 pins in a row), there you can find the Data and the Clock pins, using those you can send commans to the module, so you can turn on/off the lends, turn off and sync controllers. You can communicate with the module using a microcontroller (for example an Ardunio) or a TTL serial port.

Here's a video that I made (I'm sending commands to the module using an FTDI MM232, which is a USB to serial TTL converter): Here, you can find more information about the pinout.
And here's a sketch of my setup.

Oh and here's my post about the setup and stuff (on page 14 I think).
 
C

Crystian182

Newbie
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
If your computer recognises the module, then is's working fine. Controlling the module is an other story. There are 2 more pins on the "wider" line (5 pins in a row), there you can find the Data and the Clock pins, using those you can send commans to the module, so you can turn on/off the lends, turn off and sync controllers. You can communicate with the module using a microcontroller (for example an Ardunio) or a TTL serial port.

Here's a video that I made (I'm sending commands to the module using an FTDI MM232, which is a USB to serial TTL converter): Here, you can find more information about the pinout.
And here's a sketch of my setup.

Oh and here's my post about the setup and stuff (on page 14 I think).


thank you for the reply! I was thinking that if the central led doesn't turn on, so the module isn't working..even if the pc recognises it! So, do you think my module is working, even if led is turned off?
Thank you
 
Venix42

Venix42

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Hi there!
I tried the tutorial for the hardware module and it works perfectly. Thanks! :smile:

But it seems that I've some problem with the program allowing to control the board ( Rev H).
I used a USB UART Board ( http://www.mikroe.com/add-on-boards/communication/usb-uart/ with an FTDI Chip) to provide 3.3V to the module and I try to use it as a TTL connector to talk to the module.

While my board is not fired ( still working with some controllers), I can't manage to get a valid clock from it.
When I test connections, The RTS gives the good Volts, but the clock value is still 0Hz.
I manage to get the frequency to move by spamming the RTS test button (does that means that my soldering are bad?)
Either my connector can't work for it, either.... I don't know :tongue:

Is there something I missed?
Thanks :smile:
 
robot9706

robot9706

Enthusiast
Messages
365
Reaction score
111
Hi there!
I tried the tutorial for the hardware module and it works perfectly. Thanks! :smile:

But it seems that I've some problem with the program allowing to control the board ( Rev H).
I used a USB UART Board ( http://www.mikroe.com/add-on-boards/communication/usb-uart/ with an FTDI Chip) to provide 3.3V to the module and I try to use it as a TTL connector to talk to the module.

While my board is not fired ( still working with some controllers), I can't manage to get a valid clock from it.
When I test connections, The RTS gives the good Volts, but the clock value is still 0Hz.
I manage to get the frequency to move by spamming the RTS test button (does that means that my soldering are bad?)
Either my connector can't work for it, either.... I don't know :tongue:

Is there something I missed?
Thanks :smile:

Hi! You should check the connections and also make sure that you connected the RTS and the CTS to the right pins on the rf module. Also unfortunately there are some TTL serial chips which aren't fast enough, those chips can read the inputs around 10 times a second (10Hz) which is slow for the RF module.

Enable the CTS test, then enable the RTS output, in this case the input should be High and 0Hz. If it's OK disable the RTS output, the clock should be around 340Hz (the Low/High text is updated 10 times a second, so it's not showing correct values). Also you could connect the RTS and the CTS on the serial module, enable the CTS check and by enabling/disabling the RTS output you should see if the CTS is reading the correct values.
 
koopatroopa12

koopatroopa12

Enthusiast
Messages
55
Reaction score
4
Great guide! Had no idea you could even do this
 
Z

Zhoter Zho

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
I can't install it on Windows 10. Device Descriptor Request Failed.
 
Monkeymook

Monkeymook

Newbie
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
EDIT X2: I googled and someone mentioned running 2 of these diodes in a series will give the board almost exactly 3.3v which is what it requires. I ran the second diode into the line and presto......it synced RIGHT away when i plugged the controller in (didn't have to disconnect the adapter and plug it back in) and its been working fine for the past 15+ mins.

I literally just created an account so that I could confirm this is what solved the issue for me.

I kept installing the driver file with modified PIDs and VIDs to try to match the hardware (even though it had [UNKNOWN] for the PID), and for some reason, my copy of Windows 7 (x64) kept telling me I couldn't use it. The issue randomly went away after modifying the driver, installing it, then uninstalling it, and then installing the bundled one in the Microsoft download. No clue what happened there.

But even then, when I selected the stock ini, it gave me three options of drivers to select; one being the wireless adapter, one being the wireless controller, and one being "Unknown Device". Selecting the adapter just said the device failed to start. Selecting the Unknown Device driver did the same.

After tinkering with this for nearly two hours (that's why it looks so...poopy...right now), I decided to try the dual-diode install.

As soon as I connected the board, Windows saw it (same as before), and this time, I chose the "Show me all available drivers" option to update the hardware, and selected the stock <whateverthisiscalled>.ini file. It gave me a list of only two entries. One was the wireless adapter, and the other being the controller. No Unknown Device listing. Weird.

So I selected the wireless adapter, and it installed right away. I connected the 360 controller via the plug and play cable to my laptop, and it synced to the board right away.

So yeah. Fun story. I still have two more of these boards to build more adapters with.

What's weird though, is that I measured the voltage coming out AFTER the first diode with the failing installation, and it stated "5.05VDC". It measured the same thing after installing both diodes, but yet, the board mysteriously worked this time around.

Photo: [Click here to view this link]
 
Top Bottom