How to fix a scratched disk for not a lot of money. (Tutorial)

Discussion in 'Xbox 360' started by ii CoRrUpT xX, Dec 11, 2008 with 15 replies and 1,176 views.

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  1. ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    Please note: This tutorial was not created by me, it was created by six6sic6six on llama.com

    I am posting this guide to assist other people on these forums. I have NOT tested this tutorial, though people said it is creditable. I am not responsible for anything that you do to your disk, and again, this is not my guide.



     
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  2. Noupoi

    Noupoi Contributor

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    Nice. I have yet to get a scratched disk but this made me lol.
     
  3. Leering

    Leering (ノಠ益ಠ)ノ彡┻━┻

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    :thumbup:
    Me to.
     
  4. Mag1c

    Mag1c Since '06

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    i will be trying that this weekend lol, i will reply back with how it works
     
  5. Venomous Fire

    Venomous Fire Retired Admin 4 Life Retired

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    If this works that is ****, I might fix some discs around here for cash lol, wont let them watch the process and tell em its real hard lol
     
  6. Xpargas

    Xpargas Seasoned Member

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    It does work...sometimes
    my drive is ****ed up and it scratches discs all the time, I have fixed 2 like this but for 3 other ones it didnt work
     
  7. 0ne

    0ne Newbie

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    lol nice, this made me lol. glad it worked for you :smile:
     
  8. OP
    ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    I thought it was funny you guys broke your disks on purpose.
     
  9. OP
    ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    This method DOES work and it is very good. I fixed my friend's CoD4 disk yesterday with this. Also, car wax is not necessary, and really any toothpaste and paper towel can be used.
     
  10. Xpargas

    Xpargas Seasoned Member

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  11. OP
    ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    What? :?:thumbdown:
     
  12. tOxiC x

    tOxiC x Member

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    Banana peel works as a substitute for the toothpaste.

    BTW: Corrupt: I can tell your name is Nick by your sig :wink:
     
  13. OP
    ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    Ohhhhh ok lmao. Thanks.

    No it isn't ....lmao. How'd you come up with that? :tongue::biggrin:
     
  14. FuZioN

    FuZioN Newbie

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    might try this on some old dvds
     
  15. IncorrectUsername

    IncorrectUsername Newbie

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    The toothpaste works because although it feels smooth, it contains very fine abrasive material (powdery stuff, like the kind the Internet says people used back in the days of The Oregon Trail -- um, that's the actual trail, not the video game).

    Toothpastes all basically contain the same two things: fluoride which is great for helping your enamel stay strong and blah blah blah stupid stuff nobody cares about because it won't fix your disc, and those mild abrasives mentioned above. So if you imagine that rubbing toothpaste over the disc is kind of like rubbing fine grit sandpaper all over the disc (but on a *much* tinier scale) then you're totally right.

    The big circular scratches kill games 'cause the laser has trouble distinguishing pits/grooves/bumps/whatever thanks to Mister Scratchy...while at the same time it's kind of hard to keep following the same spiral of data when there's a big circle of happiness obscuring everything. Yes, here's another old reference: like a scratched record, where the needle keeps skipping and the same area keeps repeating, the same kind of thing happens with the CD...laser has trouble seeking the correct cylinder, then has trouble staying "on course" as it tries to read the Circle 'o Data.

    This concludes the Long Assed Explanation for Why Yes, Toothpaste Works. (caveat: don't use toothpastes with weird additives that are chemically active -- eg, "whitening toothpaste" contains *gasp* mild bleaching elements that probably won't help your cause very much.) The toothpaste etches the disc a little bit, so (for lack of a better explanation) the disc is more uniform, even if that means it (in actuality) has more (tiny) scratches now than ever before. The car wax would (ostensibly) then be used for cosmetic purposes, to try to fill those gaps -- but I'm skeptical about that part. (Make sure the wax is really freaking mild if you're gonna try *THAT* step; read the ingredients and then read them again and then read them again until you decide to skip this step, IMO. It's not *required* and it's not going to restore the disc to any kind of "factory new" look anyway, so why not focus on getting the thing to actually *play*?)

    Wax probably works great. What in the home of Our Dark Lord Satan do I know, right? Especially since I'm about to offer the following (known to work, but also known to *easily* kill discs if you're not careful) alternative method:

    Okay, alternative method -- and I urge you to not do this unless you REALLY need that data, and you're at that "no other choice" stage, and this very well may give you severe radiation sickness and infect your pet(s) with feline leukemia, blah blah blah, take your life in your own hands, etc.

    Seriously, don't do this.

    But if you want to, it can restore badly damaged discs to like new condition (IN TERMS OF READABILTY, PLAYABILITY, etc). The discs will have a soft white "haze" if you do it correctly...but it's nothing the laser can't read through. And yeah, those "resurfaced" games from BBV and Gamestop that look hazy, that's no coincidnce...

    Once again, don't do this. It's great, but don't.

    I'm serious, your cat will freaking *DIE* man...

    Okay, anyway, so taking your life in one hand and in the other, a soft cloth (not a paper towel, not a kleenex -- rag of tshirt-like material would do, but one of those dry cloths for eyeglasses would be ideal), *lightly* dampen the cloth with a VERY DILUTE (90/10) solution of water and acetone and apply it uniformly to the DATA side of the disc (data side UP, label side towards the table).

    Congratulations, you've just ruined your disc. UNLESS (!?) you then quick like a bunny run the disc under the faucet for a second or two, and then go back over it with another (different/clean) soft cloth once or twice, making sure that all the acetone is gone, oops, you forgot a spot, sorry, data's gone now...you've been warned. :frown:

    Let the little guy air-dry. Pray. Buy a new copy of the game disc so you won't be disappointed when none of this works. Then:

    If you did all of this (above) perfectly the whole "resurfacing" process should only take a few seconds, MAX, not counting the dry time. And oddly enough, this "resurfacing" has actually been the exact opposite -- you've removed a very thin (think "microscopic" or perhaps, "magical") layer of plastic from the disc. You know, that "protective plastic" that "protects your data" and "other boring stuff." Well, it turns out that it's much easier to remove a layer of plastic (making the *disc* more level with the *scratch*) than it is to fill in the scratch (while still keeping the disc readable).

    NOTES
    Water: Commonly found in oceans, check the Internet to see if anyone stocks it near you.
    Acetone: AKA nail polish remover, commonly found in bottles of nail polish remover.
    ...and you won't, although many of you will, but you won't so don't try it!
    There's enough excess plastic protecty stuff, or PPS (tm) that you can remove a layer with no adverse effects, but the margin for error is such that...


    ...well, practice with some CDrs or old AOL install discs first.
    And then don't do it. :smile:

    Alternatives, hooray!
    As an alternative, you can always spend 10-20x the money and buy a 1oz bottle of that "disc renewal/scratch-fix" stuff they sell at gamestop. There are various brands, all kinds of trade secrets, God knows what they contain....well, becides acetone and water, that is.
    I would advise against shoe polish. Just want to get that in there before someone else says it's great. So we're cool, right guys -- I've got dibs on "no shoe polish for discs," right? good. whew, disaster AVERTED!

    May your discs be hazy and smell faintly of lavender.
     
  16. OP
    ii CoRrUpT xX

    ii CoRrUpT xX Contributor

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    ...:mellow:
     
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